Big Welcome to the OFFICIAL Khon Kaen Forum!

Visit the Wild & Crazy Khon Kaen Forum Discussion Group on facebook


Author Topic: Yellow Residence Book? Permanent Residence?  (Read 9315 times)

Kajornsak

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
    • View Profile
Re: Yellow Residence Book? Permanent Residence?
« Reply #45 on: November 19, 2019, 11:19:04 PM »

For the most part, the 'application' is merely collecting many documents which you would already have. Here is a good rundown of the process if you are married. Hopefully it is okay to share:
https://www.thaicitizenship.com/thai-citizenship-for-foreigners-married-to-thai-spouse/



I was well aware of all that, having looked into a citizenship application some time ago.

For most blokes living with a Thai spouse here, the fly in the ointment is:-
- 3 years of consecutive work permits with a Thai employer,
- minimum 40,000฿salary and tax paid on that for 3 years.

Since most of us don't work, those obstacles are insurmountable.

Now, if they applied the same criteria that relates to a foreign female spouse that'd change the whole ball game ...... no working history required and therefore no tax requirement.

Talking of ‘ball games’, maybe I'll go and have a Bollockoffame operation ;-) . Nah! Thai citizenship ain't worth that sort of sacrifice.



lol, yes a bit severe.


Females also don't need to do the oath.


Most of the foreigners I know here work.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2019, 11:23:01 PM by Kajornsak »

Kajornsak

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
    • View Profile
Re: Yellow Residence Book? Permanent Residence?
« Reply #46 on: November 19, 2019, 11:22:08 PM »
Thanks for the update, Kiwiaussie. Very interesting.  Your report, of course, brings up another couple of question. Why the persistent scuttlebutt that is is impossible or nearly impossible for the unwashed heathen to get Thai citizenship?  Or does everyone already know that and it's just me that is stuck in an information distortion bubble?
It was hard when I first looked 20-25 years ago. Now it is easy, the information is there if you are interested.


I think the fact that most expats here don't bother to learn the language scares them away and they make up all kinds of strange stories like it's impossible.

Kajornsak

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
    • View Profile
Re: Yellow Residence Book? Permanent Residence?
« Reply #47 on: November 19, 2019, 11:25:43 PM »
I am a US citizen by birth.  Since this seems to a 'hot' topic, I thought I would attempt to find any information within the US Social Security System that addresses this subject, dual citizenship, US by birth and by naturalization for the other country, which might affect the ability to receive a Social Security pension.  In this instance, I would imagine that someone attempting to proceed with this is most likely not planning on renouncing their US citizenship.

This is not a trivial action to becoming a naturalized Thai citizen and continuing to be a US citizen, especially after retiring. There seems to be several legal issues where it might affect the individual with losing their rights to a Social Security pension.

For a Thai to become a naturalized US citizen, it seems the legalities are not as severe.

If a US citizen is considering to proceed with this type of dual citizenship, they should really consult a lawyer who has this type of action as one of their specialties.


You don't have to renounce your US citizenship.


But you're retired anyway and have it pretty easy here compared to a Thai trying to retire in the US. I think they need to invest 16 million baht, and the old fuddy duddies here complain about showing 800,000 for a couple of months.

Kajornsak

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
    • View Profile
Re: Yellow Residence Book? Permanent Residence?
« Reply #48 on: November 19, 2019, 11:32:48 PM »
Maybe I am wrong, but it is hard to imagine more than a tiny percentage of falang who actually want to be citizens  with a capital "C" in the flag-waving, Buddhist observing, join the military and fight for the country if invaded by Cambodia sense. I have not looked at it in a long time, but permanent residence would be fine for most.  The only problem is that PM does not mean the same thing as it does in the U.S. (and probably other countries as well).  The last time I looked at it, I did not see very many significant advantages over just continuing on a yearly visa.

When asked during the interview process why you want Thai citizenship, practical answers such as not needing to have to get visas, owning land/business,  making life easier are the best answers. We were told straight from the horses mouth by officials from the NIA, that obsequious answers were frowned upon, and not encouraged.
And if that's the case, there is more than a tiny percentage of farangs who would be totally suitable applicants!



No, don't say that you want citizenship because you don't want to get visas. This is the worst thing you could say. There are about 20 people in the room, immigration, Special branch, heads of many govt. departments. The best thing to say is that Thailand is your home, your family is here, you have no ties with your old country etc.


Did you apply from Khon Kaen Special Branch?